Is "sleep low" good and what is it?

Feel free to experiment with the amount of carbohydrates and fat before exercise. If you eat carbohydrates all the time, you can train harder and therefore develop faster than if you eat a diet high in fat and low in carbohydrates.

But there may be advantages to exercise with low amounts of glycogen in the muscles, "train low", sometimes (which you'll get if you eat low carbs and high fat or after a workout if you don't load up on carbs during or after). In fact, it can help create an environment that makes where the signals that tell your body to be more enduring come earlier, more strongly and at a lower level of intensity than when the muscle is more well-stocked on carbohydrates.

In fact, it can help create an environment that allows the signals that tell the body to become more enduring to come earlier, more strongly and at a lower level of effort than when the muscle is more well-stocked with carbohydrates.

This can be done in different ways but the simplest is ”sleep low”. This means that you first train with well-filled glycogen stores in the evening and can therefore perform at your best. During the workout you will deplete large portions of your carbohydrate stores and if you don't replenish them immediately, you will have muscles running out of carbohydrates in the hours afterwards, forcing them to use fat as their main source of energy during rest.

After your evening workout, you only need to fill up on protein and fat before going to bed. Then you can possibly add a low-intensity session first thing in the morning to reinforce the fat-driving process.

However, don't do this too often as fat-driven training will cause the development of maximum speed and performance to suffer. Some of the low-intensity sessions can be fat-driven but the high-intensity sessions the muscles should be filled with carbohydrates.